perjantai 24. helmikuuta 2017

New members added to the project

Three members FI20, FI21 and FI22 are now added to the data and are now shown on following PCA plots.

Wide European PCA including Asian references

http://www.elisanet.fi/mauri_my/pca75a.pdf

Previous PCA zoomed in

http://www.elisanet.fi/mauri_my/pca75b.pdf

PCA including only Europeans

http://www.elisanet.fi/mauri_my/pca75d1a.pdf

If you see movement in your position between the second and third PCA it is due to the difference in your Saami admixture.

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I am moving on in my targets and methods and beginning to use haplotypes. and possibly rare alleles,  instead of using genotype data.  

torstai 16. helmikuuta 2017

Rare alleles show: Baltic-Finnic people are Central Europeans with Saami admixture

Speaking about Finns one of the most speculated issues have been the origin of their minor Siberian admixture.  The debate has been effusive, but in the end only boring.  Researchers have mentioned Mongols, Chinese, Nganasans, Khanties inter alia, but, as we use to say, one should not go farther than the sea to fish.  Using rare alleles, the method used by Schiffels et al. 2015 (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms10408),  we see that the Siberian admixture is credibly explained by the common history of Finnish and Saami people and the foundation of Finnish people is in this sense in Central Europe.   Of course we need to compare rare alleles of Finns and other European populations to find out who are the closest relatives for Finns and to see details.  Volga-Finnic and Eastern Uralic people show clearly different eastern admixture.  If we assume that the Finns came from Volga or Ural regions we have to explain the difference in Asian admixtures.  The simplest way to do this would be to determine the origin of the Saami-Siberian admixture and date it.  You can see this as a hint for Estonian and Finnish researchers :)





maanantai 13. helmikuuta 2017

Ancient Latvians, comparing to modern people

New ancient Latvian genomes were figured in the new study from Jones et al.   Although all new genomes show rather low quality I have now made some dstat comparisons against modern populations.  Present-day Latvians were used as a fixed point.

PCA, trying to locate three ancient samples



And three dstat figuring samples MN2, HG2 and HG3.  Most of those samples have too low quality to give reasonable results, so I have now only three results.  I tried also map original fastq files and experienced it possible, giving more available SNP's, but I decided to not use them to ensure full comparability with the study.